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Ellen Chimz from Harare said she was happy to hear the apology. She explained why she participated in the booing of Ramaphosa. "We are very angry about what South Africans are doing; we must unite, not kill one another. We are human beings like them," she said. "They must not kill people like dogs," added Chimz. Another Harare native, Malik Mperieki, dismissed the apology, raising concern over the lives of roughly 20% of the Zimbabwean nation who have headed south seeking better opportunities amid a struggling economy and a battle to find good employment. News 

Xenophobia: Ramaphosa sends envoys to several African countries

    President Cyril Ramaphosa is sending special envoys to deliver messages of solidarity to several heads of state and governments across Africa amid tensions and violence in the country. “The special envoys will deliver a message from President Ramaphosa regarding the incidents of violence that recently erupted in some parts South Africa, which have manifested in attacks on foreign nationals and destruction of property,” spokesperson Khusela Diko said in a statement on Sunday. The team, which includes Jeff Radebe, Ambassador Kingsley Mmabolo, and Dr Khulu Mbatha are expected to…

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The ANC, Ramaphosa and the end of Zuma

What Cyril Ramaphosa must do next Johannesburg – After a bruising battle that engaged ordinary South Africans in a manner reminiscent of the heady combination of fear and hope that galvanized the country after Nelson Mandela was released from 27 years of incarceration in 1990, Mandela’s ruling African National Congress party has chosen a new leader to try to lift the country’s veil of sleaze. Cyril Ramaphosa, at present serving as a deputy to the controversial and widely-despised President Jacob Zuma, is now the shoo-in as the party’s candidate to…

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