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Op-ed Politics 

Nationalism in Africa after World War ll

The next significant event in the development of African nationalism was World War II. Nearly two million Africans were recruited as soldiers, porters, and scouts for the Allies during the war. When these soldiers returned home, they returned to colonial states that still considered them inferior. Many veterans had expected that their dedication to colonial governments would be recognized and they would be rewarded accordingly. This was not to be, and these soldiers returned home to conditions worsened by a weak global economy. Because they had fought to protect the…

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News Society Arts & Leisure 

Paradigm shift: Pres. Addo calls for a new generation of African leaders

  Ghanaian President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo has emphatically said that the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) is not prepared to intervene in another crisis in Liberia should there be one, urging Liberians to stay true to the tenets of democracy. Ghana is one of the well respected members of the regional body and this strong warning comes at a time when Liberia is yet to reach a conclusion of its electoral process, which was allegedly marred by gross irregularities and probable fraud. Liberia has the unwanted tag…

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News Public Policy 

Pres. Addo: Africans are not beggars, wants trade not aid

Africa should move beyond aid handouts that have failed to bring growth and prosperity and move to an era of mutual respect with Western countries, President Nana Akufo-Addo of Ghana said. Akufo-Addo made this known in a speech to the Royal African Society. He said aid to his nation from donor countries was unsustainable and harmful to both sides.”We do not want to remain the beggars of the world, we do not want to be dependent on charity,” he said in a speech in London, setting out a vision for…

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News Op-ed 

Post colonial nationalism in Africa

Each African nation took a unique path toward independence. Some, such as Algeria, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe, took extreme measures like waging a guerilla war on the colonial state; most countries pursued nonviolent means and achieved a peaceful transfer of power. But there were varying degrees of success. Some countries, such as Ghana, became completely independent while others, such as Congo, continued to depend on Europe, and their independence was superficial rather than absolute. As the age of independence dawned, African leaders faced the daunting tasks of developing their vastly underdeveloped…

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Op-ed Politics 

African history is a discipline on the rise

    African history is a discipline on the rise — and one that raises many questions  African history has gone through many incarnations as an academic discipline. Most recently, there’s been a global turn in African historiography. This shift has been prompted by a greater awareness of the powerful forces of globalisation and the need to provide an African historical perspective on this phenomenon. This has helped to place the continent at the centre of global – and human – history. It’s important to explain the role of Africa…

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News Sports 

Worldcup draw: Nigeria will meet nemesis Argentina

For the fifth time in six World Cup appearances, Nigeria have been drawn against Argentina in the group stage. The Super Eagles have lost all four previous World Cup meetings with La Albiceleste — in 1994, 2002, 2010, 2014 — albeit by slim scorelines. Although they showed great character in coming from behind to beat the Argentines 4-2 in a recent friendly match, it will require a tremendous performance to repeat the feat at the World Cup. Familiar foes aside, they will face new opposition in Croatia and Iceland, with…

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Business News 

Five ways to revive Zimbabwe’s economy

Current events in Zimbabwe show that while a week may be a long time in politics, it is really a very short blink of an eye in economics. Zimbabweans on the streets of Harare and Bulawayo may be hopeful for political change, but they are much more sanguine and realistic when it comes to improving the country’s economy. Presidents can be impeached in days or weeks. It takes years to wreck economies and usually even longer to repair them. So, will Emmerson Mnangagwa be able to take Zimbabwe’s economy off…

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Op-ed 

No Liberian needs war and no country is invading Liberia.

    EMOL Warns against Circumvention –Calls on NEC to Prevent Constitutional Crisiso Liberian needs war and no country is invading Liberia.     Monrovia, Liberia-Nov 14, 2017): The Emancipation Movement of Liberia, Inc. (EMOL) warns against the circumvention of constitutional due process and calls on the National Elections Commission (NEC) to adjudicate all electoral complaints speedily to prevent constitutional crisis in the Country. EMOL is a non-partisan and non-profit peace building and advocacy organization legalized in the United States and Liberia. EMOL said it is important for all Liberians at…

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Op-ed 

Open Letter to the US Embassy’s Statement on the Liberian Elections

CORRECTIVE MEASURES BEFORE RUNOFF: THE ONLY MILESTONE SOLUTION   The Editor, Over the past 24 hours, my attention has been drawn to how some Liberians have taken over social media with the US Embassy’s Statement on Liberia’s Elections without understanding the semantic nuances of the Statement. It is as a result of the varied interpretations of the Statement that I pen this letter to you. My fellow Liberians, the US Government has said it has confidence in the October Elections, which is a good thing for our integrity and reputation….

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News Op-ed 

What is in it for the Liberian people if Weah or Boakia becomes president?

  The Editor, It is obvious the next President of Liberia will either be Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) torch-bearer George M. Weah or ruling Unity Party (UP) current Vice President Joseph N. Boakia.  Both men emerged out of 20 contestants for the presidency from the October 10, 2017 representatives and presidential elections. Weah won 11 of the 15 counties of Liberia including vote rich Monterrado, but his margin of win was not enough to seal the deal. Fifty percent (50%) plus one is what required winning the Liberian presidency…

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