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Though women’s activists had done heroic work to kill the practice, Liberia’s political leaders, including President Sirleaf, avoided the topic. Op-ed 

Tell No Lies: Neurobiological consequences of FGM

    Every civilization must learn to solve the problems that undermine its progress or faces the consequences of extinction. Equally, every generation must set as its task to identify historical wrongs that are a break on transformation. This is why I have embarked on a crusade to correct the injustice. Further, It is based upon these points; also, I am working with other change agents to dispense with a common problem, which prevents some of our women, and girls- by far the most marginalized and exploited gender- from becoming…

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Kimathi, who used to write letters to negotiate with the colonial government from his hideout, further told the court that a pistol that was found on him was given to him in April 1955 by a man called Macharia Kimemia to defend himself against some members of Mau Mau who wanted him dead. Op-ed 

Dedan Kimathi Kenyan hero was executed after his own people ratted him to British—Liberian Listener

    Dedan Kimathi was in the 1950s seen as a terrorist by the British after leading the Mau Mau Uprising, an armed military struggle against the colonial regime in Kenya. But for many Kenyans, Kimathi has always been that hero who gave the British a hell of a time that would eventually pave the way towards the country’s independence. His group, the Mau Mau began as the Land and Freedom Army (KLFA), a militant Kikuyu, Embu and Meru army which sought to reclaim land that the British settlers had…

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China has no history of imposing its economic and political systems. It respects and takes into consideration other societies' histories and cultures. It is European and American imperialism that unscientifically imposed capitalism and sham liberal democracy on countries in Africa and Latin America. Countries on these continents did not have the material conditions necessary for capitalist development. But the capitalist economic base and its political superstructures were imposed as means of paving the way for capital accumulation by European and American monopolies. Additionally, there is no trace of China funding proxy wars in countries that have world views different from its geopolitical perspective. That is left to be done by US and its NATO allies. What we know of China is that it is the largest trading partner of almost every African country. Buck of imported consumer goods to the continent comes from China. China has oversea investments in finance, construction, mining, agriculture, technology, industrial production, etc. to the continent. Through bilateral arrangements, thousands of young Africans are going to China annually to further their studies in different fields. Op-ed 

Is China Colonizing Africa?

    By Moses Uneh Yahmia My answer is a resounding no. Rather than agreeing, it is logical to say China is practically demonstrating to Africa how to exorcise oneself from the ghost of over 400years of incessant imperialist exploitation – an exploitation that first began with the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and then European Colonialism and now present-day Neo-colonialism which has kept African countries in that straitjacket as producers of raw materials for western monopoly capital, outposts for the importation of manufactured goods and playground of US and NATO’s military…

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Across Africa, those who led the fight against colonial rule and those who came after them became just as brutal as those they had deposed. As Mmusi Maimane, leader of South Africa's opposition Democratic Alliance noted last year in a speech in the Senegalese capital Dakar, the same pattern is repeated. "First comes the era of colonial rule - unjust and exploitative. Then comes independence along with a new, democratically elected government. And then follows years, even decades, of oppression by the very same people who were meant to deliver freedom." Op-ed 

What went wrong with African liberation?

  The anti-colonial movements in Africa did not liberate the people; they only liberated the state.   How the recently deceased Zimbabwean ruler, Robert Gabriel Mugabe, should be remembered is a question that has split opinion across Africa. Many have hailed him as a “liberation hero” who led the fight to end white rule in Zimbabwe, while others have insisted that his transformation into a murderous dictator had tainted whatever good he had achieved in his earlier years. It is indeed a curious debate. One would think an answer would…

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“Do you want me to punch you to the floor to realize I am still there?” Mugabe told an interviewer from state television who asked him in early 2016 about retirement plans.mAfter the fighting between black guerrillas and the white rulers of Rhodesia, as Zimbabwe was then known, ended, Mugabe reached out to whites. The self-declared Marxist stressed the need for education and built new schools. Tourism and mining flourished, and Zimbabwe was a regional breadbasket. Tributes 

Former President Robert Mugabe Dies at age 95

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Former Zimbabwean leader Robert Mugabe, an ex-guerrilla chief who took power when the African country shook off white minority rule and presided for decades while economic turmoil and human rights violations eroded its early promise, has died in Singapore. He was 95. Mugabe enjoyed strong support from Zimbabwe’s people soon after he became the first post-colonial leader of what had been British-controlled Rhodesia. Often violent farm seizures from whites who owned huge tracts of land made him a hated figure in the West and…

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Nkrumah arrived in the Gold Coast on 14 November 1947. He immediately assumed his secretarial duties, offering to work without pay after he realised that the party had no funds to pay his monthly salary. Eventually, the leadership prevailed on him to accept a fraction of the salary. Nkrumah immediately drew up a detailed, radical plan which he presented to the leadership of the United Gold Coast Convention. He suggested that the party set up branches in every corner of the country and embarks on demonstrations, strikes and boycotts to press for independence. Op-ed 

Kwame Nkrumah’s contested legacy

    Kwame Nkrumah led Ghana to independence in 1957 – the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to achieve this feat. He’s still remembered for his unrepentant anti-colonial stance and strident Pan-Africanism. Above all, he is regarded as one of Africa’s ablest statesmen of the 20th century. Nkrumah has been ranked among leaders such as Vladimir Lenin, Mahatma Gandhi and Mao Tse-Tsung. All contributed significantly in shaping the course of history during the last five decades of the 20th century. Nkrumah’s rise in the anti-colonial movement in Ghana, then called the Gold Coast, began in the late…

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The two were discussing the Tanzanian delegation’s reaction to the vote after delegates danced in the chamber. “To watch that thing on television, as I did, to see those, those monkeys from those African countries – damn them, they’re still uncomfortable wearing shoes!” Reagan tells Nixon, who erupts in laughter. The recording was first published in the Atlantic magazine in an article written by Tim Naftali, who directed the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum from 2007 to 2011. Public Policy 

 Reagan called African leaders ‘monkeys’ in call to Richard Nixon 

  Ronald Reagan made racist remarks about African delegates to the United Nations, calling them “monkeys” and saying they were still “uncomfortable wearing shoes”, newly released audio recordings have revealed. Reagan, the actor turned politician who was a popular two-term president, made the comments in a phone call with the disgraced former president Richard Nixon as the two discussed a 1971 vote by the UN to recognize China, instead of the US ally Taiwan. At the time of the call, Nixon was still president and Reagan was governor of California, both the BBC…

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Truth be told, this practice is brutish, backward, reactionary and of no significance today, and thus, should be jettisoned. It merely glorifies the masters’ way of intimidating their subjects, inciting imminent fear among the people by divisions and classifications. culled from, www.face2faceafrica Public Policy 

African courts are glorifying colonialism with wigs

  SIKA-AYIWA AFRIYIE SAFO | Contributor   The tradition of wearing horsehair wigs, perukes, ‘a term derived from the French word perruque (weaving wig)’ and gowns by the judiciary predates the 15th Century. In the 14th Century, during the reign of King Edward III, the accepted costume for nobles who appeared before the Court of the king was the robe. Later in the 17th Century, the gown was adopted together with the peruke (horsehair wig) as the formal apparel of judges and lawyers, a bid to differentiate the elite from the commoners. Originally, judges were…

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Where are we and why our contribution to African literature is not acknowledged or even celebrated by ourselves, much less by others outside of our borders? The simple answer is we don’t have a cultural policy that promotes literature and other works of arts as in other countries in our continent. In any other society, these early writings would be reprinted and taught to new generations, which may draw inspiration from them, as it is noted that ‘the past must inform the present.’ Society Arts & Leisure 

Exploring Contemporary Liberian Literature

    The first African novel is said to have been written by a Liberian writer, Joseph Walters, in 1891. The novel was Guanya Pau, a story of an African Princess. If you add the names of other Liberian writers such as the renown Pan-African nationalist, Wilmot Blyden, Edwin Barclay, Hilary Teage, who wrote the Liberian National Anthem, Doris Banks Henries, Roland T. Dempster, Robert H. Brown, Henry B. Cole, or Kona Khasu, it shows that Liberia has made great contribution to African literature from as far back as the…

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Business News 

Pan-African Free Trade Deal Is In Effect Now

    After years of painstaking negotiations, the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) agreement finally came into effect on May 30. Yet huge obstacles remain as African leaders iron out legislation on inter-state agreements and build the infrastructure needed to enable regional trade. In a major boost to the regional integration agenda, the first phase of the Africa’s continent-wide free trade agreement, signed by 44 African countries in Rwanda in March 2018, was finally completed last week. The agreement, which plans to boost regional trade by 54% by cutting…

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