Predictably, the coup failed, and Rawlings was arrested and condemned to death in a military trial. But his blunt statements on the country’s urgent need for a new era of social, political and economic justice had fired up his peers, and on 4 June 1979 a group of soldiers forcibly released him from prison before he could be executed. Tributes 

Revolutionary Pan Africanist Leader Jerry John Rawlings Dies at 73

By Victoria Brittan   Jerry Rawlings, the former military leader then twice-elected president of Ghana, who has died aged 73, dominated the country’s political life for two decades in the 1980s and 90s. In May 1979, Flt Lt Rawlings of the Ghanaian air force burst on to the country’s political scene. With a handful of officers, he launched an unsuccessful coup d’etat against a corrupt and discredited military government headed by Gen Fred Akuffo, shortly before a planned election. Rawlings was part of a radical underground organization in the military…

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Ho Ho, dear reader, they are obviously in transit. Even the post office takes time these days to deliver on such promises. Trust me, they are really great-looking bird stamps. Birds, and lots of ‘em. Hey, look out the window: there’s a Liberian pterodactyl attacking that space monster in the park! WOW, did you see that? Incredible. Tributes 

Bird Land: The beautiful birds and stamps of Liberia

    By Dag W. Walker   My mother was a status-conscious woman back in the old days when working class people had aspirations of climbing the social ladder into the dizzying heights of the middle class. My mother, realizing she would never be the high-achieving being she longed to be, determined that I would be her surrogate, that shining social success she failed to become. Success, mine and hers, depend on me to rise, according to my mother’s limited understanding of success, to the professional heights as a doctor…

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The new President’s accepted the challenge with an amazingly activist response: the university had “duties to society.”[3]  This singular statement became a powerful metaphor of self-determination. It motivated his indefatigable efforts to provide teaching and learning services to thousands of UL students caught in the bind of a fratricidal conflict that had destroyed all the infrastructure of the nation’s oldest institution of higher learning founded in 1862 as Liberia College.  Tributes 

PROFESSOR PATRICK LAWRENCE NIMLEY SEYON: A Eulogy

  By Amos Sawyer Today we say farewell to Professor Dr. Patrick Lawrence Nimene Seyon, a distinguished Liberian public intellectual and progressive activist. Comfort and I  and our family would like to convey to you, Barbara, his spouse; to Tuan, Juah and Marena his children; and to the other members of his family our condolences for his loss and to say to Barbara, thank you for taking good care of him and making him happy, especially during the declining years of his life. May God richly reward you all. Patrick…

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The new President’s accepted the challenge with an amazingly activist response: the university had “duties to society.”[3]  This singular statement became a powerful metaphor of self-determination. It motivated his indefatigable efforts to provide teaching and learning services to thousands of UL students caught in the bind of a fratricidal conflict that had destroyed all the infrastructure of the nation’s oldest institution of higher learning founded in 1862 as Liberia College.  Tributes 

A Tribute to Dr. Patrick L.N. Seyon, University President

  By Al-Hassan Conteh, Ph.D The family of Dr. Patrick L.N. Seyon, the Ninth President of the University of Liberia (UL) (1991-1996), recently announced his passing. According to a fitting tribute by eminent historian Dr. Elwood Dunn, “Patrick passed away recently in the State of Massachusetts, USA in the loving care of his wife, Dr. Barbara Greene Seyon.”[1] As a mentee and collaborator of Dr. Seyon in the reopening of the University of Liberia during the Liberian civil war, I would like to add my voice to  Dr. Dunn’s kind…

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Bai T. was a father, a great husband, and family man, but he was the mentor of many young Liberians who were seeking a place for Liberian literature in the world, especially, during those several years before his death. I visited both his home and his office a few times to chat with Bai T. Moore during those last years. Despite his fame and place in Liberia then, he was always willing to listen to us young people, and was quick to offer his words of wisdom whenever you found yourself in his presence. He was a very calm and wise man who reminded many of us younger writers of his place as father and elder in our quest to define Liberian literature and to help Liberian literature find its place in the world of African literature. Tributes 

Remembering Bai T. Moore, Poet, Writer, Novelist

By Dr. Patricia Jabbeh Wesley An Elder’s Prayer Oh great Spirit of the forest, I have nothing in my hand But a chicken and some rice It’s the gift of all our land Bring us sunshine with the rain So the harvest moon may blow Save my people from all pains; When the harvest time is done We will make a feast to you. —-By Bai T. Moore The late Bai T. Moore was born on October 12, 1910 in the town of Dimeh, a Gola village between Monrovia and…

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Cheapoo later participated in the 1997 general elections as the standard bearer of a reconstituted Progressive People's Party (PPP).  Additionally, Cllr. Cheapoo will be remembered for his struggles and efforts for multi party democracy in Liberia as he was persecuted by the political establishments he served, impeached by two different 'Assembly' of the Liberian legislatures, showing what appeared to be a non-ethnic cleavage to his politics, since his advocacies and persuasions while in office were against two different parties and ideologies. Accounts say, under what looked to be ’kangaroo court' by the hegemonic-one party True Wing Party led oligarchy and the military cum-civilian governments of the National Democratic Party administrations, Cheapo was sanctioned as the legislatures of the era according to reports acted against the national interests to undermine and intimidate his person, because of his independence and outspoken personality and convictions. Tributes 

Chea Cheapo: progressive icon and Supreme Court Chief Justice is dead- (1942-2020).

Staff Report Cheapoo (1942_2020) served in the late 1970s as a Senator from Grand Gedeh County. At that time, he also served as the head counsellor for the Progressive Alliance of Liberia (PAL), an opposition party later outlawed by President William Tolbert.  In early 1980, he served as a spokesman for its successor, the Progressive People’s Party (PPP). Following the overthrow of the Tolbert government in a 1980 coup, Cheapoo was appointed Attorney General in April 1980 under the People’s Redemption Council regime. However, Cheapoo was removed from his position…

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Not many people can reach through when your soul is battered, make you feel seen, communicate genuine care, and move you to laughter in those low moments. Thomas Jaye possessed this generosity of spirit. There was gentleness at his core. In an ancient, pre-colonial time, one can imagine him being a great healer, teacher, or wise, benevolent ruler. He was at once dignified, witty and humble, a calming physical presence in that special way the truly great sons of Africa are. Tributes 

Of Grief and Memory: Mourning Big Brother Comrade Thomas Jaye

  By Stephanie C. Horton   “The duiker will not paint ‘duiker’ on his beautiful back to proclaim his duikeritude,” Wole Soyinka wrote, “you’ll know him by his elegant leap.” Not many people can reach through when your soul is battered, make you feel seen, communicate genuine care, and move you to laughter in those low moments. Thomas Jaye possessed this generosity of spirit. There was gentleness at his core. In an ancient, pre-colonial time, one can imagine him being a great healer, teacher, or wise, benevolent ruler. He was…

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Unarguably, there's a very critical few of our gullible generation who sees merit as the sincerest tool to morally fulfill the prophecy of man's indebtedness to transform his understanding and society. We have held sacred those deep Hegelian dialectics the, moral and spiritual decadence, wide-scale violence, economic hardships, complacency, stunning poverty, conflicts, a buckled education system, paralyzed health system, vilified cultural configuration, gullible youths, unprepared menfolk, and the monstrous intransigent vices of capitalism. Tributes 

Tribute: Eulogizing the Revolutionary Journey of H. Boimah Fahnbulleh, Jr.

  We have searched, as well as studied and struggled for the objective conditions of our people and the achievement of an egalitarian society. We have always wanted a better Liberia, where Liberians will live irrespective of their tribe, culture, race, tradition, and creed or political affiliation. We went to the houses of the grandeur political politicos including those who are in the status quo yet we couldn’t get the empirical answer we wanted to march in the people’s struggle. Nonetheless, we remain with the facts to ascertain our acceptance…

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Tributes 

Nigeria Reggae Legend Majek Fashek dies at 57

    By GBENGA BADA   REGGAE star Majek Fashek joyfully sang “Majek Fashek in the New York” and the gifted musician died in a hospital in the American city on Monday around 5:45 pm. after a health crisis that lasted nine months— September 2019 till June 2020. A singer and multi-instrumentalist, Fashek introduced the world to a softer-edged style of reggae which he touted as ‘kpangolo music’ in 1988 on his debut album ‘Prisoner of Conscience’. His influences included Jimi Hendrix to Bob Marley and Fela Anikulapo Kuti. In…

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Here is it: Illusion is being extinguished, the charade has ended, and the old moribund True Whig Party has fallen from grace to grass being defenestrated, being consigned to the ash heap of history by their social inferiors, as they call the people. A new day has come. The masses are joyous; the exhilaration is electric, and the celebration has overwhelmed the streets. Monrovia has seen a swarm of stampede, hope high, aspiration reawakened, and a new day has come. The wall of invincibility has fallen like a deck of cards. All the reactionary rhetoric of using the coercive force of the state to teach the working people and Liberian masses a lesson has been all talk, talk and talk. Tributes 

Still in the cause of the people: a tribute to Prof. Dew Mayson

By A. Bombo Kiadii We must not lose focus to convey an outpouring of comradely salutation to a remarkable icon who has fought relentlessly to reshape the historical contours of the fatherland and make his worthwhile contributions to the peoples of the global South in the fight for social justice, equality, and a better world. As I journey through history and look back to the defeat of the bankrupt oligarchy, I have developed a great admiration for this man and his comrades who placed their lives on the line. As…

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