Blyden believed that the underdevelopment of Africa in the ninetieth century was due to historical factors such as slavery and the slave trade rather than race. To Blyden, if equal opportunities were provided for both races, not even the average African could be outsmarted by the White man. Blyden gained prominence in Liberia where he married into a prominent family and had three children with his wife, Americo-Liberian Sarah Yates. They had three children together and he also had five children with Anna Erskine, an African-American woman from Louisiana whom he had a long-term relationship with while living in Freetown Sierra Leone. Before his death on 7 February 1912 in Freetown, Sierra Leone, where he was buried, Blyden had worked as a journalist, a professor, college president and diplomat serving as an ambassador for Liberia to Britain and France. Araba sam/Face2face Tributes 

Edward Wilmot Blyden: The African Personality

The phrase “African Personality” was first introduced by Edward Blyden in a lecture titled Study and Race, delivered in Sierra Leone, Freetown on 19th May 1893. African Personality was mainly informed by Blyden’s personal experiences of slavery and racism and also an attempt to challenge racist scientific theories. Edward Wilmot Blyden was born on 3rd August 1832 in the West Indies (St. Thomas of the Virgin Island) to free parents at a time when slavery had not been abolished. In a quest to gain higher education, Blyden attempted to enroll…

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So your protégé’s character was not only impacted by the values from Lofa County and the Monrovia-ghettos’ diverse culture, but also impacted by two less obvious things among the different developments in the 70s. These two things, A Song And A Pair Of Sandals, grounded in the goodness of simplicity, also added a meaningful interpretation for me to what Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. meant when he said; “…they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” Tributes 

The idea of simplicity and honesty: A Tribute to Togbah Nah Tipoteh

    It is a general knowledge that mankind is not only endowed with his/her genes, but endowed with family norms, educational developments, religious upbringings, community influences, etc.; or as Ms. Carolyn N. Kinder of Yale University puts it: “The genes you are born with influence your behavior. Your social environment including your family, school and neighborhood also influence your behavior.” So your protégé’s character was not only impacted by the values from Lofa County and the Monrovia-ghettos’ diverse culture, but also impacted by two less obvious things among the…

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When the British colonial officers refused to give permits for demonstrations, activist Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti mobilized local market women for what she called “picnics” and festivals. One of few women in early 1920s Nigeria to receive post-primary education, Ransome-Kuti used her privilege to coordinate the resistance against colonialism in Nigeria that not only targeted the British but also the local traditional figureheads they used to enforce their rules. Tributes 

Africa has forgotten the women leaders of its independence struggle

When the British colonial officers refused to give permits for demonstrations, activist Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti mobilized local market women for what she called “picnics” and festivals. One of few women in early 1920s Nigeria to receive post-primary education, Ransome-Kuti used her privilege to coordinate the resistance against colonialism in Nigeria that not only targeted the British but also the local traditional figureheads they used to enforce their rules. The Abeokuta Women’s Union, which she founded, protested unjust taxes, corruption and the lack of women’s representation in decision-making corridors. While she is…

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In 2004, Brumskine campaigned for the 2005 elections, receiving nearly 14% of the vote, 6% less than the second-place candidate, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, and therefore he was not able to participate in the runoff. Due to his popularity in the first round, he could have significantly influenced the run-off had he endorsed either candidate. He decided not to endorse Sirleaf or her opponent, George Manney Weah in the runoff. Tributes 

Charles W. Brumskine [1951-2019], Former Senate President has died

Charles Walker Brumskine, former President of the Liberian Senate, and senior partner of the Brumskine and Associates law firm, located in Monrovia has died. He was 68. Mr. Brumskine who has been ailing for quite some time, was hospitalized at the John Hopkins medical center in Baltimore, Maryland, Family sources said. the politician and lawyer left the hospital months ago and was being treated at his home in Virginia, he was pronounced dead Wednesday afternoon. Cllr. Brumskine, who contested the Liberian presidency on three separate occations,  rose to prominence during…

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Tributes 

The Dictatorship in Kenya under Daniel Arap Moi, 1978-2001

Arab Moi at 95 years, is reportedly on his death bed with some news suggesting he is dead, this article was originally titled: Human Rights Abuse in Kenya under Daniel Arap Moi, 1978-2001. Arab Moi is remembered and will always be seen as belonging to the pantheon of African dictators in post colonial Africa that rolled back the freedoms and sustainable developments of the African people when they yearned so much progress after independence—editor ____________________ Introduction Jomo Kenyatta, the founding president of Kenya, passed away in August 1978 after fourteen…

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Remembering Thomas Sankara on the 30th anniversary of his assassination Tributes 

Remembering Sankara on the 30th anniversary of his assassination

Amber Murrey Thomas Isidore Noël Sankara (1949-1987) was assassinated 30 years ago, on 15 October 1987. He was one of the most confident and outspoken anti-imperialist leaders of the late 20th century. Sankara’s life and political praxis continue to be significant in shaping and inspiring anti-imperial and Pan-African youth activism and resistance across the African continent and beyond. Revolutionary “Madness” In terms of revolutionary movements in Africa, Sankara’s stands out not only because it occurred well after independence but also because of the ambition of its vision. Sankara was a…

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Frank E. Petersen Jr., who suffered bruising racial indignities as a military enlistee in the 1950s and was even arrested at an officers’ club on suspicion of impersonating a lieutenant, but who endured to become the first black aviator and the first black general in the Marine Corps, died on Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, Md., near Annapolis. He was 83. Tributes 

Frank E. Petersen, First Black General in Marines, Dies at 83

  By Sam Roberts Frank E. Petersen Jr., who suffered bruising racial indignities as a military enlistee in the 1950s and was even arrested at an officers’ club on suspicion of impersonating a lieutenant, but who endured to become the first black aviator and the first black general in the Marine Corps, died on Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, Md., near Annapolis. He was 83. The cause was lung cancer, his wife, Alicia, said. The son of a former sugar-cane plantation worker from St. Croix, the Virgin Islands, General Petersen…

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“Do you want me to punch you to the floor to realize I am still there?” Mugabe told an interviewer from state television who asked him in early 2016 about retirement plans.mAfter the fighting between black guerrillas and the white rulers of Rhodesia, as Zimbabwe was then known, ended, Mugabe reached out to whites. The self-declared Marxist stressed the need for education and built new schools. Tourism and mining flourished, and Zimbabwe was a regional breadbasket. Tributes 

Former President Robert Mugabe Dies at age 95

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Former Zimbabwean leader Robert Mugabe, an ex-guerrilla chief who took power when the African country shook off white minority rule and presided for decades while economic turmoil and human rights violations eroded its early promise, has died in Singapore. He was 95. Mugabe enjoyed strong support from Zimbabwe’s people soon after he became the first post-colonial leader of what had been British-controlled Rhodesia. Often violent farm seizures from whites who owned huge tracts of land made him a hated figure in the West and…

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Themba began teaching at the school in St. Joseph, where he lived, and it was here that he influenced the life of another great writer of Africa: Mbulelo Mzamane. In an appearance on the South African Broadcasting Digital News, Mzamane talks about how Themba taught him about literary giants, including Shakespeare. For Themba, this must have been a reprieve from the inferior education he was forced to teach the kids in South Africa due to the Bantu Education Act. This ability to do so did not cause Themba to forget South Africa’s struggles, though. He never really stopped being a voice against the apartheid in his homeland. His mere presence, when combined with his and Father Ciccone’s preaching, made sure that the true nature of the apartheid regime of South Africa did not remain an unknown topic in Swaziland for long. Tributes 

Biography of Can Themba by Aisha Ahmed

Golden City Post Can Themba was born a Black South African in a country where his race comprised of the majority. His status in the population did not reflect the living style that would commonly be associated with someone who would be living in the land of his ancestors. Instead, Themba was constantly on the receiving end of the prejudices, hostility, and control [by] the White people of South Africa, directed towards the Blacks in that country. He did not remain silent, though. Themba educated the next generation of his…

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The two authoritative sources that I have just given do not make competence or integrity of relatives an exception to the definition. Therefore, those who are saying that the appointment of relatives who are competent and have integrity falls outside the definition of nepotism are wrong. Unless they write their own dictionaries, they have to accept the current definition of nepotism. Except for monarchies, like Kingdoms and empires, where countries are ruled by families, nepotism is wrong everywhere, especially in democratic countries such as ours. Nepotism is wrong because it is an abuse of power. It provides a situation where the best jobs in a country are occupied by relatives of public officials. It deprives better qualified citizens who are not relatives of public officials of opportunities for employment. A nepotistic leader promotes patronage, opportunism and sycophancy as avenues for employment. In an atmosphere where nepotism prevails, honest patriots and nationalists are deprived of opportunities for employment because they are not prepared to stoop so low. Nepotism therefore is a dangerous and very serious corrupt practice because it has the tendency to promote corruption and mass unemployment. Tributes 

Pan African Nationalist and MOJA Chair Celebrates Natal Day

    Liberia is a democratic state. It is the will of the people that must prevail at all times, not the wishes of an individual.—Tiawon Saye Gongloe,—   Progressive icon and Chair of the Movement for Justice in Africa [MOJA], Cllr. Tiawon Saye Gongloe turns 60 today. The astute lawyer who is also Liberia National Bar Association president was a student activist in the late 1970s and was imprisoned and beaten for speaking out against the government of then-president William Tolbert, and later for speaking out against President Charles…

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