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Monrovia, October 15, 2019 -- The National Democratic Coalition of Liberia (NDC) strongly denounces the atrocities committed by President George Weah’s government against unarmed students who were seeking an audience with the President on behalf of their unpaid teachers. This latest attack by armed state police on peaceful students comes in the wake of a peaceful protest in support of their teachers. The teachers are on strike in demand of months of salary arears owed them by the Liberian government. This brutality by the government against peaceful students was unprovoked and absolutely unjustified. Public Policy 

Liberia: NDC denounces brutal government atrocities against peaceful students

    Monrovia, October 15, 2019 — The National Democratic Coalition of Liberia (NDC) strongly denounces the atrocities committed by President George Weah’s government against unarmed students who were seeking an audience with the President on behalf of their unpaid teachers. This latest attack by armed state police on peaceful students comes in the wake of a peaceful protest in support of their teachers. The teachers are on strike in demand of months of salary arears owed them by the Liberian government. This brutality by the government against peaceful students…

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During the Legislative conference, Professor Olympia Beko, head of the international criminal justice unit of the human rights law centre, University of Nottingham, and David Scheffer, first U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues (1997-2001), will provide expert advice to members of the Legislature and Liberian stakeholders working on the Draft Act to Establish an Extraordinary Tribunal for War and Economic Crimes for Liberia via video-conference. Public Policy 

Is Liberia ready to address war crimes?

    The essentials: Liberia’s President George Weah is making moves that may lead to the establishment of an economic and war crimes court. This week, Weah submitted recommendations to parliament and sought advice on addressing human rights violations, war and economic crimes committed during the 14-year-long Liberian civil wars which ended in 2003. The background: President Weah appears to be bowing to pressure from civil rights groups and Liberian citizens to finally address the injustices of the wars. Although the Liberian truth and reconciliation commission recommended the establishment of a special…

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Making sure that the rule of law is upheld and Taylor brought to justice for his heinous crimes, sadly not for Liberia, but Sierra Leone, James Verdier worked pro bono to helped indict the war criminal, currently incarcerated in England. His commitment to the welfare of the Liberian people has always been paramount and this character has been impeccable. Observers say as Liberia looks to buried it past and move away from leaders who are so easily consumed by power, as they quickly forsake the national interest for personal aggrandizement, Jerome Verdier are those kinds that Liberia needs, as is indicative in the TRC report which he released with his fellow commissioners. Public Policy 

Liberia: Gangsters’ Paradise says former TRC Chair

“The culture of impunity has emboldened criminals in government and in the corridors of power to new heights of violence and crime, fully aware that they will not face justice anytime soon under the Weah regime because the perverse President of Liberia champions impunity, supports injustice and will not bring his henchmen to justice…” Cllr Jerome J. Verdier, Sr (Cllr), Executive Director, IJG The International Justice Group (IJG) based in Washington DC has issued a statement condemning the rising tide of violence and heinous crimes occurring regularly in the Country and…

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“We must move away from this xenophobic word, because it brings us to the wars and makes it seem like South Africans hate foreigners, when we have lived with whites and Indians who we don’t know where they come from. We are proudly South African,” Bhengu said at the Jeppe police station in July 2015. Public Policy 

Xenophobia: South African Politicians are in denial!

    “Both the municipality and the Malawian High Commission are in agreement that the incidents that led to Malawian nationals being chased out of their homes are not xenophobia but were criminally motivated, as their belongings were stolen by the angry mob.” This was the response from Durban’s eThekwini Municipality following attacks against Malawians in April that displaced about 100 migrants. This denialism is not a new phenomenon. In 2006 Michael Neocosmos noted the pervasive denialism around xenophobia by the political class in his seminal book, From ‘Foreign Natives’ to ‘Native Foreigners….

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There is a cognitive bias around the perception of Nigerians in South Africa and in fact many parts of the world. Criminal activities by a few Nigerians are leading to profiling of the larger group. More importantly, this profiling is failing to see the positive activities by Nigerians. For example, South African universities are well-ranked comparatively to the rest of the continent. This ranking is based on research outputs, ability to attract international students among other factors. Research output is ranked based on affiliations and not nationality, scholars from Nigerians and other Africans therefore significantly contribute to this ranking for South African universities. Another example refers to the various technical and volunteering services done by Nigerians. For instance, The Redeemed Christian Church of God in South Africa has numerous CSR initiatives in South Africa with funding coming from members who are predominantly Nigerians. Public Policy 

FACTSHEET: South Africa’s crime statistics REVEALED

FACTSHEET: South Africa’s crime statistics for 2017/18 Researched by Africa Check This factsheet summarises statistics for South Africa’s main crimes of public interest during 2017/18. NOTE: Following the release of South Africa’s 2017/18 crime statistics, Africa Check published an analysis [READ]which showed that the police had made an error in calculating the 2017/18 crime rates. The police have nowrevised the crime rates [READ]to correct this error. The factsheet below contains the corrected ratios. South Africa’s crime statistics for the 2017/18 reporting year was released in parliament [READ]on 11 September 2018….

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Pres Zuma and his family are involved in everything, E-tolling, with the infamous GUPTA family, these are the same people who are involved via Zuma’s son Duduzane in any and all future nuclear energy projects. Is it true that Zuma is also participating in the Louisiana project of SASOL for the extraction of oil from shale? This project is also way over budget! There are many examples of where the Zuma’s and the Guptas are involved. Unfortunately, they are only succeeding in destroying South Africa! Public Policy 

South Africa: State failure is the ‘new normal’

Is South Africa becoming a failed state?   While Cyril Ramaphosa promises “new dawns” and plays around with property rights, latest crime figures remind us yet again that the government cannot provide South Africans with the security they pay for. Although the incidence of some crimes has decreased, murders are at the highest level in 15 years. The number in 2017/2018 was 20 336 – the first time the figure has topped 20 000 since 2003/2004. The latest murder rate – 35 for every 100 000 people – is the…

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In the coming November 2017 presidential election in Liberia, ethnicity, tribal politics and native identity are advantageous, and therefore some candidates are using them to win the election. Public Policy 

Chaos and brutality in Liberian politics Part IV

  By Dagbayonoh Kiah Nyanfore II   William Tolbert’s presidency   Tubman’s successor, President William Tolbert, a fellow Americo-Liberian, utilized tribalism when he spoke Kpelle, a native language, in his first inaugural address. By speaking Kpelle, Tolbert was considered a Kpelle man, a native man. He received praises for his speech in the native tongue. No one complained and no one accused him of tribalism. Like Tubman, he knew that in order to become popular among the native people, he must identify with them. He joined the Poro Society, a native…

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Again the Congo elite found this new ethnicity unwelcoming, seeing it as a threat to their power. They complained to the president and suggested for him to go slow with the changes. Despite the complaints and suggestion, Tubman continued with the reforms as they increased his popularity in the country. He wore a country gown at tribal functions, and particularly in his home county Maryland, people called him a Grebo native man. Tubman, a native man, and no one complained or accused him of tribalism. Public Policy 

Chaos and brutality in Liberian politics Part III

    By Dagbayonoh Kiah Nyanfore II   1955 election The election of 1955 can be called in Liberia the election of the century. It was a race between the teacher and the student or the father versus the son. Former president Edward Barclay challenged President Tubman. Why did Barclay, who was comfortably retired, come out to challenge his in-law and protege? The narrative below answers the question. Having resisted petitions to challenge Tubman and having patiently tried and unable to change Tubman’s mind regarding the reforms, Barclay finally agreed…

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The flag of any nation is a symbol of pride and unity. A nation’s flag can also be a symbol of disunity. Liberia is such a country whose flag it has been argued in many quarters is misrepresent instead of uniting its people. The Liberian flag is a symbol of what I referred to as “misrepresentation”. By misrepresentation, I mean its so-called national colors – red, white and blue (horizontal stripes of red and white and a blue field with one star) are a copy of the American flag plagiarized by Susannah Lewis who thought she was Betsy Ross, who is credited with making the first American flag. This irritation represents only a segment of the Liberian society and excludes the rest. And as such, the symbol doesn’t arouse the united front of the Liberian citizenry like the American flag. Public Policy 

Calls to change the Liberian flag grows louder

    The Editor, In 1905 British imperialist and businessman Sir Harry Johnston visited Liberia, and in his 1906 report, he imputed that the Lone Star flag and its colors “has no reference whatever to the characteristics of the Liberian Republic”. He recommended the adoption of the flag below. The black would represent the dominant negro race in the country. The yellow would represent the African races which mingled anciently with the Caucasian – Mandingoes, and Fulas. The one white stripe would be the recognition that Liberia holds her existence to…

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Again the Congo elite found this new ethnicity unwelcoming, seeing it as a threat to their power. They complained to the president and suggested for him to go slow with the changes. Despite the complaints and suggestion, Tubman continued with the reforms as they increased his popularity in the country. He wore a country gown at tribal functions, and particularly in his home county Maryland, people called him a Grebo native man. Tubman, a native man, and no one complained or accused him of tribalism. Public Policy 

Chaos and brutality in Liberian politics Part II

    By Dagbayonoh Kiah Nyanfore II   Tubman’s strategies and ethnic politics  Tubman’s control of Liberia and the use of tribalism and Congoism were skillfully implemented. Studies show that past Liberian politicians utilized tribalism and ethnicity to their advantage. Tubman as a boy wanted to become a minister of the Lord. His parents came to Liberia in 1844 as freed slaves from Georgia. His father Alexander Tubman was a Methodist pastor and the Speaker of the Liberian House of Representatives. At first, the [son] Tubman started as a poor…

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