MONROVIA – Zenu Miller has died. The unfortunate incident occurred Saturday morning after suddenly falling off and was rushed to the ELWA Hospital, family sources told FrontPageAfrica. While the cause of his death is yet to be made public, Zenu had been complaining of chest pain since he was manhandled by officers of the Executive Protection Service late January at the Samuel Kanyon Doe Sports Stadium during the National County Sports Meet. He served as editor, talk show host and news director at Truth FM 96.1, owned by Liberian businessman. Musa Bility, and T-Five radio station of Representative Thomas Fallah. He also worked at the Lone Star Cell Communications Incorporated and OK FM99.5 in Monrovia – where he worked until his demise. It can be recalled that Mr. Miller was reportedly flogged during the final football match of the 2020 National County Meet between Nimba and Grand Kru Counties at Samuel Kanyon Doe Sport Complex on January 26, 2020. Related Posts Liberia Quietly Tackling Coronavirus; 71 Travelers from… Feb 15, 2020 Liberia Moves to Minimize Gasoline Shortage After Days of… Feb 15, 2020 Liberia: Chinese Doctor Has Heart on Homeland As Coronovirus… Feb 15, 2020 “I was attacked tonight at the SKD [“Samuel Kanyon Doe” Stadium] by EPS [Executive Protective Service] officers in the full view of the EPS director. Gosh!!!” Zenu Miller posted on his Facebook page. The Executive Protective Service (EPS) is President George Weah’s elite security forces. Miller complained that he suffered severe pains in the chest and legs as a result of the assault, forcing him to seek medical treatment. Several Liberian journalists took to the social media on Saturday expressing their regrets and sympathies for the passing of one of their colleagues. Family members and workmates are presently gathering at the hospital to arrange for the removal of the journalist remains, or to take a glance of the corpse. Editor's Desk 

The Listener demand an immediate investigation into his brutal beating before an autopsy

E D I T O R I A L The Liberian Listener is calling on the Liberian government to commence an investigation into the death of Liberian journalist Zenu Miller. Before his death, the broadcast journalist complained that he was attacked by state security officers, of the Executive Protective Service or the EPS, the presidential detail of the presidency. The Liberian Listener rejects the Liberian govt rush to obtaining or performing an autopsy, while at the same time refusing to investigate who is responsible for manhandling this journalist while abusing…

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The African Union and regional bodies like ECOWAS seem to be Africa's problems on this continent, because not until African countries begin to go up in flames do they start to intervene. These are early warning signs of conflicts, and something genuine needs to be done. The Ecowas and the AU will sit and keep an arms-length against these deteriorating situations in Guinea, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Gambia and many of the regional countries. In Togo, the President there is also seeking to change the constitution to extend his term, yet African leaders are quiet. Where is the leadership and voice of our continental powers: Nigeria, South Africa, and Ethiopia? Editor's Desk 

The Constitutional Coup In Guinea, Ecowas & AU must say NO to Alpha Conde!

——-E D I T O R I A L The Liberian Listener notes, that as Africa seeks answers to the many issues this continent faces, the least that the African people should be worried about is term extensions by African leaders. In Guinea, this is exactly what is playing out in the West African country, because President Alpha Conde is determined to extend a third term, in violation of the country’s Constitution, yet Ecowas and the African Union are quiet. These days the AU that is controlled by African Presidents…

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What should be done? The Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) is lobbying for joint military operations involving regional states. But intelligence sharing, border controls and efforts to win over local populations would be cheaper and more effective. Ecowas should redouble efforts to avert electoral crises that militants could use to their advantage. Editor's Desk 

The looming jihadist threat to West Africa stability

    Faced with jihadist breakthrough in Burkina Faso, neighbouring states in West Africa’s Gulf of Guinea increasingly fear attacks in their own territories. These countries should improve intelligence sharing, strengthen border controls and regain the trust of local populations. What’s new? Islamist militants’ lengthening reach in the Sahel, particularly in Burkina Faso, is a growing concern for coastal West African states. These states’ leaders fear that militants could use Burkina as a launching pad for operations further south. Why does it matter? Militant attacks could threaten coastal states’ stability.…

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Gifts are exchanged. On 31 December participants celebrate with a banquet of food often cuisine from various African countries. Participants greet one another with "Habari gani" which is Kiswahili for "how are you/ how's the news with you?" For further information about Kwanzaa, write to the University of Sankore Press, 2540 W. 54th St., Los Angeles, CA 90043. A children's book about KWANSA by Deborah Newton Chocolate is available through Childrens' Press, 1990, Chicago. Culled -Akwansosem is an outreach newsletter Editor's Desk 

Three Swahili Kwanzaa Phrases That Uncover The Holiday’s Origins

    Let’s take a moment to discover a little more about the week-long celebration of Kwanzaa, and the language that makes it so colorful — Swahili. The end of December brings a whole lot of joy to many different cultures and religions around the globe — some people light candles, some decorate trees, some perform intricate dances. As for Kwanzaa, a cultural holiday, it’s all about history, heritage, and and bringing African people together. 1. The meaning of Kwanzaa: Matunda ya kwanza Meaning ‘first fruits’ or ‘first fruits of…

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Governments hit by unrest are presented with a similar dilemma: Use the opportunity of mass protest to accelerate social transformation to solve the underlying cause of unrest, or violently repress the people and suffer a decline in the new form of power. Occupy’s repression under former U.S. president Barack Obama arguably contributed to disillusionment, and the weakening of the progressive establishment, that fuelled Donald Trump’s victory. Mr. Obama failed to understand Occupy’s emergence as a symptom of the millennial generation’s existential anxiety about the future. What we craved was dramatic change, in any direction. The new wave of protest is an opportunity to chart a new course for humanity. Let’s not squander it. first published in the Globe and Mail December 2019, this piece was originally titled: Protests are everywhere. The world is rising up. So can humanity Editor's Desk 

The new understanding of the global protest movements

  It’s happening again: Revolutionary fever is infecting the social body. The people of Hong Kong, Lebanon, Chile, Liberia, Iran, Iraq and beyond are mobbing the streets in massive numbers. These movements are achieving a level of militancy not seen in a decade. Spectacular street violence has toppled Bolivia’s former president, Evo Morales, while elsewhere governments hang on, deploying riot police in Iraq, closing the border in Colombia, disabling the internet in Iran. The frenzy of protest appears contagious. Elites and activists in stable countries are rightly wondering if the…

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These are the same young people who saw Mr. Weah as the “Country Giant.” Even though then-candidate Weah never had a debate with any of his opponents during the presidential campaign to know his local and world views of the issues, and he never held a press conference, and never put forward his governing platform and ideas, Liberians foolishly voted for George Manneh Weah. Editor's Desk 

The numbers that help explain why protests are rocking countries around the world

    From Hong Kong [Gambia, Liberia] to Iraq to Chile, protesters around the world have taken to the streets to rally against their governments in recent months. On the surface, some protests have appeared to be spontaneous outbursts of anger over seemingly minor concerns. But almost all of this year’s major protests have deep roots and are the result of years of mounting frustration over environmental inaction, economic troubles, mismanagement, corruption or governmental repression. Protesters were only lacking a final spark. With protests roiling the globe, we explain the…

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Gifts are exchanged. On 31 December participants celebrate with a banquet of food often cuisine from various African countries. Participants greet one another with "Habari gani" which is Kiswahili for "how are you/ how's the news with you?" For further information about Kwanzaa, write to the University of Sankore Press, 2540 W. 54th St., Los Angeles, CA 90043. A children's book about KWANSA by Deborah Newton Chocolate is available through Childrens' Press, 1990, Chicago. Culled -Akwansosem is an outreach newsletter Editor's Desk 

Kwanzaa- What Is It? A Unique African Holiday It Is

Dr. Maulana Karenga introduced the festival in 1966 to the United States as a ritual to welcome the first harvests to the home. Dr. Karenga created this festival for Afro-Americans as a response to the commercialism of Christmas. In fact one might say that Kwanzaa has similarities with Thanksgiving in the United States or the Yam Festival in Ghana and Nigeria. The word “kwanza” is a KiSwahili (Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania) word meaning “first.” Five common sets of values are central to the activities of the week: ingathering, reverence, commemoration, recommitment,…

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He added: “I, Zoely Zoe or Tarplah Z. Davies, will never ever sit down in this America when Henry Costa and his likes who are thinking about covertly overthrowing the Government of Liberia and thinking about looting the resources of our country. When they carry out their wicked plan, I will not sit in this America and witness my country in chaos. I will defend my properties, I will defend my government and people, I will defend my family and do everything possible to ensure that those people who have their devilish intention of trying to subvert the Constitution, their plans are reverted and the Constitution will take over. Editor's Desk 

An Opened, Televised Confirmation HEARINGS

E D I TO R I A L_________ The Liberian Listener is calling on the Honorable Liberian Senate to give the nation a live, and open confirmation hearings on Private Tarplah Davis, the new nominee for the Position of Deputy Defense Minister for Operations, at the Defense Ministry of the Republic of LIBERIA, OUR COUNTRY! The Liberian Listener will continue to make this case leading up to the confirmation hearings, of Mr. Davis. Now, that the President’s spokesman has confirmed he will not withdraw the nomination—we want to make sure…

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Editor's Desk 

Romeo-Mark’s If Only the Dust Would Settle: A Review

By Valerie Knowles-Combie Althea Romeo-Mark’s collection of selected poems, If Only the Dust Would Settle, is the outgrowth of a series of poetry readings, commissioned by VITA (Verein fur Interkulturelle Treffpunkte und Anlaufstellen), an “umbrella organization that focuses on the integration of immigrants in Switzerland.” Romeo-Mark’s introduction explains that her poems are connected to a personal essay. “A Home with Endless Space” (7), a very significant construct that reinforces the meaning of “home” and “space” to the author’s primary theme.  While her poems are divided into five sections, Romeo-Mark’s skillful…

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Editor's Desk Interviews 

11 Questions Zubin Cooper, Actor

Zubin Cooper is a Liberian documentary maker, actor and producer. He just finished his first Cannes Film Festival appearance, starring in ‘The Last Face’, a movie that covers Liberia, Sierra Leone, South Sudan and South Africa. He joined the project as a consultant, but given his immense talent, Zubin ended up making his acting debut in the role of ‘Dr. Mousa.’ 1. Liberians have been excited and more so since you appeared on the red carpet in Cannes, France. What has the reception for you been in Liberia and from…

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