His 19 track album, 'African Giant,' was nominated alongside music heavyweights including Angelique Kidjo and Altin Gun. He follows in the footsteps of Femi and Seun Kuti, (the sons of legendary musician, Fela Kuti) King Sunny Ade and other Nigerian music stars. It has been a standout year for Burna Boy, (real name Damini Ogulu) who has won a string of awards and sold out venues across the globe. It's all a far cry from when he was yet to attain global fame and his Coachella billing apparently displeased him. Artists & Reviews 

Grammy Nomination: ‘African Giant’, Burna Boy’s roaring success

Lagos, Nigeria (CNN)Award-winning Nigerian singer, Burna Boy has topped off a stellar music year with a Grammy nomination and cemented his place as this year’s breakaway music star. His 19 track album, ‘African Giant,’ was nominated alongside music heavyweights including Angelique Kidjo and Altin Gun. He follows in the footsteps of Femi and Seun Kuti, (the sons of legendary musician, Fela Kuti) King Sunny Ade and other Nigerian music stars. It has been a standout year for Burna Boy, (real name Damini Ogulu) who has won a string of awards…

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Ngũgĩ wa Thiongio will succeed Vinton Cerf, known for being one of the fathers of the Internet. Cerf was the first technologist to receive the prize, with other awarded figures including the philosopher Karl Popper, oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, politician Václav Havel, writer Doris Lessing, and activist Malala Yousafzai. The prize will be awarded to the Kenyan author during the first quarter of 2020 at a ceremony chaired by Catalan president Quim Torra.  Artists & Reviews 

Kenyan writer and activist Ngugi wa Thiong’o wins Catalonia International Prize

    The Kenyan writer and activist Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o has been awarded the 31st Catalonia International Prize given by the Catalan government, “for his distinguished and courageous literary work and his defense of African languages, based on the notion of language as culture and collective memory.” “Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o is one of the most prolific and renowned African writers,” reads the jury’s communiqué. “In all the genres he cultivates – novels, essays, memoirs, theatre – he combines the most profound African traditions with a sensitive yet merciless description of the social…

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http://www.literaryorphans.org/playdb/two-poems-patricia-jabbeh-wesley/?fbclid=IwAR0byNvX4cElB_Ya3Uu0zpv5SfTMf6RfVA5RI2FXJtkBQtgFgCvp0vS3f44 Artists & Reviews 

Literary Orphan Published These Two Poems By Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

Poet Patricia Jabbeh Wesley was born in Monrovia, Liberia, and raised there and in her father’s home village of Tugbakeh, where she learned to speak Grebo in addition to English, the national language. In 1991, Wesley immigrated with her family to southern Michigan to escape the Liberian civil war. She earned a BA at the University of Liberia, an MS at Indiana University, and a PhD at Western Michigan University. Vulnerable in their combination of grief and levity, Wesley’s poems deal with family, community, and war. “What I try to…

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Born in Antigua, West Indies, Althea Romeo-Mark is an educator and writer who grew up in St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. She has lived and taught in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, USA, Liberia (1976-1990), London, England (1990-1991), and in Switzerland since 1991. She earned a B.A. in English and Secondary Education from the University of the Virgin Islands and an M.A. in Modern American Literature from Kent State University, U.S.A. She also has a Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (CETEFLA). Artists & Reviews 

Former UL Prof Romeo Mark’s poems are published in Beyond the Long Lines

  Born in Antigua, West Indies, Althea Romeo-Mark is an educator and writer who grew up in St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. She has lived and taught in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, USA, Liberia (1976-1990), London, England (1990-1991), and in Switzerland since 1991. She earned a B.A. in English and Secondary Education from the University of the Virgin Islands and an M.A. in Modern American Literature from Kent State University, U.S.A. She also has a Cambridge Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (CETEFLA). She considers herself a citizen…

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And, though the narrative surrounding the assimilation of Liberia’s African American founders with the indigenous population is hardly one that always had a harmonious denouement, Vamba’s Land of My Fathers doesn’t focus on rehashing the inharmonious. Rather, it is a story about genuine friendship, mutual respect and love between an Americo Liberian, as the settlers became known, and an indigenous character that stood the test of time. It is truly a story about what was possible and what could be for his country, Liberia. Artists & Reviews 

Vamba Sherif’s Land of My Fathers: A Review

On February 4, 1857, Mary Mickey, a former slave from Charlottesville, Virginia, wrote a letter to her former master about her journey to Liberia and her impression of the new country she would now call home: “It affords me great pleasure to have this opportunity to address a letter to you. In the midst of danger & death, while we could discern nothing above, & around us but the blue canopy of heaven, & under us the deep, deep blue sea, we were Providentially cared for, and bless to reach…

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Ms. Golakai and her co-winners, Gloria M. Odari, Parselelo Kantai, and Nnamdi Oguike will each receive a grant of €18,000 to allow them to take a year off to finish the Spectral novel. “Spectral is a terrifying examination of the tensions between freedom and social order. It will have speculative fiction themes: fantasy, science fiction, horror, magical realism. I love mixing science with fantastical and unknown,” Ms. Golakai said about the upcoming book. Artists & Reviews 

Liberian Writer Golakai Wins 2019 Morland Writing Scholarship

    Liberian Author Hawa Jande Golakai has emerged as one of the four joint winners of the prestigious Morland Writing Scholarships for her work Spectral.​​ Ms. Golakai, a speculative fiction author and a professional medical immunologist, is the first and only Liberian to win the Morland scholarship prize since its inception in 2013. Ms. Golakai and her co-winners, Gloria M. Odari, Parselelo Kantai, and Nnamdi Oguike will each receive a grant of €18,000 to allow them to take a year off to finish the Spectral novel. “Spectral is a…

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Artists & Reviews 

10 things you didn’t know about South African rapper Sho Madjozi

    Sho Madjozi is the professional name of Maya Christinah Xichavo Famo. For those who are curious, she is a South African singer and songwriter who has been known to act from time to time as well. Here are 10 things that you may or may not have known about Sho Madjozi: 1. Born in Limpopo Madjozi was born in a small village in the South African province of Limpopo. In short, the province is named thus because of the Limpopo River, which serves as its northern border as…

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There is an evident absence of a critical mass of students and academics who are engaged in radical social movement organizations. Rodney used the platform of the university to engage in the production and dissemination of oppositional ideas and scholarship. He entered the wider society to educate and mobilize the working-class for self-organization. His legacy of principled commitment and activism is something with which activists or organizers should become fully aware. Neoliberal capitalism has established a seemingly unchallenged ideological and political dominance in the current period. It has left many people believing that there is no viable alternative to capitalism. Rodney would have rejected this defeatist tendency that has induced many progressives to abandon their radical politics or commitment to socialism and accept liberal capitalist democracy as the only political game in town. Some former radicals have gone over to social democracy, which is essentially capitalism with a human face. Artists & Reviews 

Walter Rodney: Pan-African Revolutionary Intellectual

Walter Rodney has demonstrated through thought and action that it is not inevitable for intellectuals to join the systems of oppression and use their knowledge and skills to perpetuate exploitation. They have the option of committing “class suicide.” Rodney called on the intelligentsia to use their knowledge and skills to challenge and undermine oppression. “In evaluating Walter Rodney one characteristic stands out. He was a scholar who recognised no distinction between academic concerns and service to society, between science and social commitment. He was concerned about people as well as…

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I am sending the Liberian Listener a link to a book that I hope will give your readers some hours of enjoyment as a literary work and one too that will offer insights into the history of many African nations. Given the nature of politics, one must be discrete in this world when reading such a title, given the heavy hand the police and govts. Who knows how many people could easily misinterpret the independent scholar's interest in such a work? Artists & Reviews 

BOOKS: Coup d’État —[Africa] Edward N. Luttwak /REVIEW

The Editor, I’d like to point out, though we don’t need a reminder at all, that as scholars, artists, and intellectuals it is our duty, our life-long duty to learn. We, as thinkers and creators, have a duty to learn as much as we can about the depths and distances of all areas of knowledge known to man. Were we to shy away from areas of thought from fear, then we would betray our gifts as thinking men. But, there are times, there are areas of thought, there are themes that…

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Coates grew up in a home and a world where consciousness in thought and deed was the ultimate reflection of what it means to be a human being, where books and papers surrounded him and reflected him. He sought other stories in comic books and novels. Baltimore in the ’80s demanded a different education of him, one where he was bored by teachers, fell asleep in class, walked through the streets assessing the landscape and the people incessantly, wary and aware that at any moment, at any time, he could be jumped and beaten for any number of imagined offenses by boys who looked like him. That world trained Coates to navigate violence with his body and his mind, pressured his inner self to become the man he is today, a man with a baby face and easy bearing whose looks belie the weapon within, a self honed to a scythe’s sharpness. Artists & Reviews 

The Beautiful Power of Ta-Nehisi Coates

With his groundbreaking nonfiction works, Ta-Nehisi Coates emerged as our most vital public intellectual. Now, his debut novel, The Water Dancer, takes him to uncharted depths. BY  JESMYN WARD PHOTOGRAPHY BY  ANNIE LEIBOVITZ AUGUST 6, 2019 Coates, photographed in Brooklyn.PHOTOGRAPH BY ANNIE LEIBOVITZ. When I meet Ta-Nehisi Coates, I am surprised. All of the photos I’ve seen of him are somber and inscrutable, but when I walk into the café where he’s suggested we meet, he’s not like that at all. He’s one of those people who looks young at any age:…

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