"I Senator Oscar A. Cooper take this opportunity to formally withdraw my membership and a role as advisor to the Council of Patriots (COP). I greatly appreciate the opportunity to have been one of the initial organizers with other great Patriots," Senator Cooper said. News 

Liberian Senate rejects money printing, says no to Pres. Weah

    Monrovia—-Members of the Liberian Senate have rejected the requested for printing of new Liberian banknotes by the Executive through the Central Bank of Liberia.Addressing the official closing of the 54th session of the Liberian Senate Friday, October 04 in the chambers at the Capitol, Senate President Pro-Tempore Albert Chie explained that senators raised, among others, concerns of proper internal controls at the Central Bank as was indicated in the Kroll Report, including confidence factor and source of the US$31 Million being requested to pay for the printing of…

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But everything changed, when Garley was captured by troops working for top Liberian government officials, who were tasked with forcibly recruiting people to work on the Spanish-owned sugar cane, coffee and cocoa plantations in Fernando Po (located in current day Equatorial Guinea and parts of Gabon). Many of these forced recruits were abducted from the southeastern region of Liberia. Munah waited as the days turned to weeks and the weeks to months but her husband did not return. After six months she walked alone on the 155-kilometer bush road back to Grand Gedeh.  It took her weeks to reach home.  When she finally reached, she ignored pains of the sores in her feet and ran around Pelezon Town beating her breast and crying as she told her ordeal.  Public Policy 

Fernando Po Crisis: the shame and of lack of accountability in Liberia

MONROVIA – The future was bright for Doboe-Blee Garley, a 20-year-old, newly-married man in 1926. Well built and outstanding in the Menson Clan of Tchien District in Grand Gedeh County, Garley was a great royal hunter and a farmer. His wife, Munah, had come from a long lineage of traditional priests. Excitedly, the newlyweds made their way to the seaport city of Greenville to buy lapas, salt, and dishes for their home, according to citizens of Pelezon and Garley’s 62-year-old niece Theresa Boryea Walo, to whom the late Garley told…

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But even with African demand for and influence of the textile, it is not lost that having a relationship with the print that is mainly skewed towards consumerism puts Africans at a disadvantage in the long run. Obinyan puts it aptly: “From the buyer’s perspective they benefit because it’s cheap, but cheapness at what cost?” Culled By Chidinma Irene Nwoye /Quarts Africa Business 

The Chinese have taken over African wax and prints

      When you think of African fashion, you often think of the variety of brightly dyed fabrics worn on the continent and in the diaspora as shirts, pants, dresses, skirts and even the occasional head wrap on that cool “woke” black girlfriend. In Africa, they are everywhere at every time—from funerals and weddings, to markets and casual Fridays at the office. The ubiquitous batik-inspired wax print or—as it’s known in some countries—”Ankara” has come to denote Africanness. It is a fabric that represents African authenticity and helps people…

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