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Romeo's first volume of poetry, The Silent Dancing Spirit was published in 1974. She taught for a year at Kent State in the Department of Pan-African Studies, but then decided to move to Africa and began working as an assistant English professor at the University of Liberia. In 1977, she married and continued teaching and writing, publishing three additional volumes of poetry: Palaver: West Indian Poems in 1978, Two Faces, Two Phases in 1984, and Beyond Dream: The Ritual Dancer in 1989. In 1984, Romeo-Mark, along with C. William Allen, Keith Neville Asumuyaya Best, Henry Gensang, Thomas Johnson and Ruth Wuor founded the Liberian Association of Writers (LAW). Artists & Reviews 

Two Poems: Crossing Frontiers and Crossing the Road

 

 

Romeo’s first volume of poetry, The Silent Dancing Spirit was published in 1974.  She taught for a year at Kent State in the Department of Pan-African Studies, but then decided to move to Africa and began working as an assistant English professor at the University of Liberia. In 1977, she married and continued teaching and writing, publishing three additional volumes of poetry: Palaver: West Indian Poems in 1978, Two Faces, Two Phases in 1984, and Beyond Dream: The Ritual Dancer in 1989. In 1984, Romeo-Mark, along with C. William Allen, Keith Neville Asumuyaya Best, Henry Gensang, Thomas Johnson and Ruth Wuor founded the Liberian Association of Writers (LAW).

Beginning in the 1990s, her poetry and short story work was published in two regional journals in the Caribbean, The Caribbean Writer and POUi, the literary journal of the University of the West Indies. In 1995, she won second prize at the annual Stauffacher’s English Short Story Contest. Several works have also been published in international anthologies, like Sisters of Caliban: Contemporary Women Poets of the Caribbean published in 1996 and the short story “Easter Sunday” published in the Norwegian anthology Karibia Forteller in 2001. Since 2004, Romeo-Mark has served as the poetry editor of Seabreeze: Journal of Liberian Contemporary Literature. In 2009, she published a fifth volume of poems If Only the Dust Would Settle[2] and was awarded the Marguerite Cobb McKay Prize by The Caribbean Writer. In addition to recognition for her work in anthologies, Romeo-Mark has been a featured poet at several international poetry festivals including an event hosted by the Virgin Island’s Cultural Heritage Institute,the 20th International Poetry Festival of Medellín and the Kistrech Poetry Festival in Kisii, Kenya.–wikipedia

 

Crossing Frontiers

The faces, within bullet proof cubicles,
wear emotionless masks. Greetings are brisk.
Bureaucrats are robotic-ready with drilling questions:
Name? Country? Reason for visit?

They will listen to the stories
of the nobodies on slow-moving lines,
from a land without rain;
and a country where the rich
own everything except some souls;
and a family from a place
where clan is killing clan

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