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This was a very meaningful conversation I had with my fellow Liberian writer, Eudora Aletta. So besides the political talks and photo ops, meeting Eudora who I have communicated with for years was one of the highlights of the convention for me. I hope to read and review her novel, The Wind of Change. Op-ed 

When I Met A Liberian writer, Eudora Aletta

Inter-Generational Transfer of Knowledge

 

The Editor,

On the sideline of the 2019 Felmausa Convention, I had an enlightening conversation with fellow Liberian writer, Eudora Aletta. She is a Canada based multi-talented artist. She is a singer with a beautiful melody. She performed and wowed the crowd with her soulful melodious songs. Not only is she a singer, but she’s also a writer with a passion for social justice advocacy. Her current novel is titled, A Wind of Change. Her politic is Pan Africanism, inspired by the heroism of Pan African revolutionary heroes like Kwame Nkrumah, Sekou Toure, MLK, Malcolm X, Thomas Sankara, and others.

We discussed many things. Among them was «intergenerational transfer of knowledge ». That is, the knowledge of our past that are transferred from generation to generation. This is the essence of education in any society. Our society being of an oral tradition where we learned at the feet of our elders in towns and villages, many of us learn from our fathers and mothers and now living in America and other places far from home, we still maintain our culture and tradition. The question now is, how much of the culture will we be able to transfer to our children? Will our culture survive among our children born in America, Europe, Australia, Asia and other places outside of Africa? One could sense such question in remarks made by several of our American born children who spoke at the event. How much can they learn from us and be able to transfer the knowledge, tradition, and culture to generations to come?

As writers and cultural promoters, we agree that we have to promote the culture of reading in our community so as to introduce our kids to books that speak to their cultural heritage so they can’t be lost of who they are. Our culture has to survive not only through the oral transfer of knowledge but through the pages of books. So In subsequent Felmausa convention, we hope to set up tables to promote books that speak to our cultural heritage as Liberians, as Africans.

This was a very meaningful conversation I had with my fellow Liberian writer, Eudora Aletta. So besides the political talks and photo ops, meeting Eudora who I have communicated with for years was one of the highlights of the convention for me. I hope to read and review her novel, The Wind of Change.

—-Nvasekie Konneh

 

Main pic/Nvasekie Konneh

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