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In a place where poverty is eternally grinding, where hunger is the norm with xenophobia being the order of the day, and terrorism tearing the fabrics of the societies, how can social and economic freedom and political accuracy be achieved? Answers to these questions were provided in the keynote paper delivered by Professor Aja Akpuru-Aja, of the Abia State University, Uturu, whose theme dwelt on Pan-Africanism, the African Union and continental security: Matters Arising. Op-ed 

Pan Africanism Taking Hold In Nigeria

    Pan-Africanism in the areas of arts, music, politics, entertainment, film-making, leadership was the theme of the just-concluded international conference in Abuja on Pan-Africanism and the Forging of a New African Identity in the 21st Century. Edozie Udeze who attended the two-day event, writes on the proceedings that raised new hopes on Pan-Africanism and its many affiliates For two days last week, scholars, historians, political scientists, theatre artistes, music teachers and literary scholars from Nigeria and other parts of the world, gathered in Abuja, essentially to dwell on the…

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The concept of Pan-Africanism is perhaps more popular now than it ever was. There are great Pan-African activists scattered on the continent of Africa but only a few like Professor Patrick Loch Otieno Lumumba and Kemi Seba can match the determination of the early pan-African heroes. Op-ed 

Why Every African Should Embrace the Pan-African Struggle for a United Africa!

  By: Sebastiane Ebatamehi The Pan-African struggle is not an individual one, it is collective, and Africa needs you. The concept of Pan-Africanism is perhaps more popular now than it ever was. There are great Pan-African activists scattered on the continent of Africa but only a few like Professor Patrick Loch Otieno Lumumba and Kemi Seba can match the determination of the early pan-African heroes. One thing that has contributed to this, however, is the fact that modern education and innovation has taken the minds of African youths off Pan-Africanism….

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News Society Arts & Leisure Tributes 

Top Ten African Leaders Of All Time

    #1. Thomas Sankara, born on Dec 21st 1949, killed on Oct 15th 1987, was a charismatic left-wing leader and president of Upper Volta, which he renamed Burkina Faso (“the land of upright people”) during his period of office between 1983 and 1987. As a professing Pan Africanist he fought for a united Africa. He is frequently referred to as the “Che of Black Africa” for his resemblance to Ernesto Guevara with regards to personality and political ideas. Inspired by the Cuban Revolution, Sankara is widely considered as an…

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Op-ed Tributes 

Thomas Sankara’s Short Life Was Worthwhile

The Editor Sankara seized power in a popularly-supported coup in 1983, aged just thirty-three, with the goal of eliminating corruption and the dominance of the former French colonial power, he immediately launched one of the most ambitious programs for social and economic change ever attempted on the African continent. To symbolize this new autonomy and rebirth, he renamed the country from the French colonial Upper Volta to Burkina Faso (“Land of Upright Man”). His foreign policies were centered on anti-imperialism, with his government eschewing all foreign aid, pushing for odious…

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Artists & Reviews 

The Rise And Paradoxes Of Pan-Africanism Today

Of the numerous concepts which have influenced Black Africa since the wave of independence in the 1960s, pan-Africanism is, after democracy, probably the most popular. Paradoxically, the continent remains the least integrated in the world and continues to experience outbreaks of xenophobic violence. Historically, the first pan-African movement, founded in the late 19th century, was a search for a common identity: “˜pan-Negrism’. The aim was to unite black people across the world in order to fight slavery and colonialism. Pioneers were Edward Blyden, WEB Dubois, Stokely Carmichael and Kwame Nkrumah….

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Politics 

Dissecting The Politics Of Edward Wilmot Blyden

By Edward Carter Making remarks at the program marking his 70th natal day, the Orwellian political scientist, the unrelenting Dr. Amos Claudius Sawyer made a rather interesting disclosure: He stressed that he will avail himself in part to establish a “chair of public affairs” at the University of Liberia in honor of the late so-called Pan African Nationalist, Edward Wilmot Blyden. Dr. Sawyer’s disclosure has provided an opportunity to take a second look at Mr. Blyden from the prism of his so-called African nationalist inclinations for which he is to…

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