Ellen Chimz from Harare said she was happy to hear the apology. She explained why she participated in the booing of Ramaphosa. "We are very angry about what South Africans are doing; we must unite, not kill one another. We are human beings like them," she said. "They must not kill people like dogs," added Chimz. Another Harare native, Malik Mperieki, dismissed the apology, raising concern over the lives of roughly 20% of the Zimbabwean nation who have headed south seeking better opportunities amid a struggling economy and a battle to find good employment. Public Policy 

The African Union’s crisis of legitimacy: Africans are concerned

  If it cannot address systematic human rights abuses on the continent, what really is the purpose of the African Union? On May 29, just four days after George Floyd’s death in police custody, African Union Commission’s Chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat issued a scorching statement condemning the Black man’s “murder … at the hands of law enforcement officers” and reaffirmed “the African Union’s rejection of the continuing discriminatory practices against Black citizens of the United States of America”. A few weeks earlier in April, following the news of the Chinese…

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