Governments hit by unrest are presented with a similar dilemma: Use the opportunity of mass protest to accelerate social transformation to solve the underlying cause of unrest, or violently repress the people and suffer a decline in the new form of power. Occupy’s repression under former U.S. president Barack Obama arguably contributed to disillusionment, and the weakening of the progressive establishment, that fuelled Donald Trump’s victory. Mr. Obama failed to understand Occupy’s emergence as a symptom of the millennial generation’s existential anxiety about the future. What we craved was dramatic change, in any direction. The new wave of protest is an opportunity to chart a new course for humanity. Let’s not squander it. first published in the Globe and Mail December 2019, this piece was originally titled: Protests are everywhere. The world is rising up. So can humanity Editor's Desk 

The new understanding of the global protest movements

  It’s happening again: Revolutionary fever is infecting the social body. The people of Hong Kong, Lebanon, Chile, Liberia, Iran, Iraq and beyond are mobbing the streets in massive numbers. These movements are achieving a level of militancy not seen in a decade. Spectacular street violence has toppled Bolivia’s former president, Evo Morales, while elsewhere governments hang on, deploying riot police in Iraq, closing the border in Colombia, disabling the internet in Iran. The frenzy of protest appears contagious. Elites and activists in stable countries are rightly wondering if the…

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These are the same young people who saw Mr. Weah as the “Country Giant.” Even though then-candidate Weah never had a debate with any of his opponents during the presidential campaign to know his local and world views of the issues, and he never held a press conference, and never put forward his governing platform and ideas, Liberians foolishly voted for George Manneh Weah. Editor's Desk 

The numbers that help explain why protests are rocking countries around the world

    From Hong Kong [Gambia, Liberia] to Iraq to Chile, protesters around the world have taken to the streets to rally against their governments in recent months. On the surface, some protests have appeared to be spontaneous outbursts of anger over seemingly minor concerns. But almost all of this year’s major protests have deep roots and are the result of years of mounting frustration over environmental inaction, economic troubles, mismanagement, corruption or governmental repression. Protesters were only lacking a final spark. With protests roiling the globe, we explain the…

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