I fondly recall beloved Miss Donner von Blitzen, my third grade school teacher. I’m not saying she was mean and ugly, but when she went down to the swamp all the toads croaked. Aside from that true fact, which I am not making it up, Miss Donner von Blitzen had a particular bad habit of beating us kids when we used the perfectly good English word “ain’t.” I have the scars to prove it. My feeling to this day? “Ain’t nobody’s business if I do.” Music 

Big, Bad Bessie Smith, A Great Blues Singer

    By Dag Walker   I fondly recall beloved Miss Donner von Blitzen, my third-grade school teacher. I’m not saying she was mean and ugly, but when she went down to the swamp all the toads croaked. Aside from that true fact, which I am not making it up, Miss Donner von Blitzen had a particularly bad habit of beating us kids when we used the perfectly good English word “ain’t.” I have the scars to prove it. My feeling to this day? “Ain’t nobody’s business if I do.”…

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Hawkins was born in Oakland, California, in 1943. He too is now dead. In 1967, he and Betty Watson co-founded the Northern California State Youth Choir of the Church of God in Christ with 46 singers ages 17 to 25. In a time of eight-track recorders, they used a two track recorder in the church and eventually made 500 copies of their albumn, featuring Dorothy Combs Morrison as female lead. They recorded the album Let Us Go into the House of the Lord, 1968, at the Ephesian Church of God in Christ in Berkeley, California   Music 

200 years later—in 1968, Edwin Hawkins and Oh Happy Day!

  By Dag Walker   Most afternoons back in my old hometown the old guys would sit in cane rocking chairs out front of Virgil’s barbershop down on Main Street, smoking old pipes, dozing off in the summer sun, straw hats covering their wrinkled, bald heads; and when their heads jerked up as they awakened briefly, they would talk slow and soft about the olden days of their youth. They were old, indeed, but none of them recalling the old days ever talked about the year 1755. They missed something…

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Society Arts & Leisure 

Travelogue: I’ve been on the road for almost 50 years now. I have a lot to learn yet. 

  By Dag Walker   It’s easy to rush around the world looking at important sites only later to find one has missed the life of locals who make the world human. I travel so I can experience the greatness of places, to see architectural wonders, historic events, artefacts unique and brilliant. Sometimes, though, I just cross the street to talk to locals about their neighborhood. Nothing much comes from casual conversations on the street most of the time; but sometimes– not today but sometimes– I am enlightened in a…

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Diana Ross and the Supremes, “Where did our love go?”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1Ta5TlCBR8 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berry_Gordy https://www.britannica.com/biography/Berry-Gordy-Jr https://www.biography.com/musician/berry-gordy-jr https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/the-motown-story-how-berry-gordy-jr-created-the-legendary-label-178066/ Music 

When Berry Gordy made Motown Our Town

  By: Dag Walker   Growing up in the 1950s and ‘60s in the remotest parts of the Rocky Mountains in the United States of America we had our musical traditions, old guys like Elmo from down the road who played fiddle at the weekend barn dance, Zeke on spoons and a tin bucket, Bobby Joe on washboard, and Betty Lou singing up a Country Western storm of heart-break and horses on the lone prairie. Yes, there was fancy music, stuff we never actually heard in those cold, high mountains…

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In Los Angeles, Herb Reed, a recently discharged Army veteran recruited Cornell Gunther, Joe Jefferson, and Alex Hodge to form a vocal quartet he would eventually name The Platters. The group’s name came from the metal disks, or “platters,” that rotate vinyl records on the turntable of a phonograph. These four men were the “original” Platters in 1953. Music 

The Platters: music was grande in the 1950s

By Dag W. Walker Music history was grand in 1953. It was the year the American group The Platters was formed in Los Angeles, California. In LIberia that year, Solomon Carter Fuller, born in Monrovia, a pioneering physician, psychiatrist, pathologist, and professor died] on January 16, 1953. William Vacanarat Shadrach Tubman was the 19th president of Liberia, with William Tolbert as Vice President. In Los Angeles, Herb Reed, a recently discharged Army veteran recruited Cornell Gunther, Joe Jefferson, and Alex Hodge to form a vocal quartet he would eventually name…

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Jockk Brand vs. the Man at the Top of the Stairs  and Other Men Hiding in the Shadows in the Garden Evening. Icy Cafe, Street of the Monkeys, Phom Phen.  Op-ed 

I might have been better on a hilltop in Nepal

Introduction: Dag Walker is an amazing writer traveling the world, who currently finds himself in Quito, Ecuador, where he enjoys the beautiful weather far from his own home– in North America. In the mountains and hills of his current residence, he finds time, and solace to contemplate writing and structuring his thoughts as he pound ideas we need in a world that seeks to self destruct, writing that he is “hopeful”! Walker wrote this short essay as— a reflection of what writers go through before they get published, but also…

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Jockk Brand vs. the Man at the Top of the Stairs  and Other Men Hiding in the Shadows in the Garden Evening. Icy Cafe, Street of the Monkeys, Phom Phen.  Society Arts & Leisure 

Jockk Brand vs. the Man at the Top of the Stairs: excerpts from a Novel 

Jockk Brand vs. the Man at the Top of the Stairs  and Other Men Hiding in the Shadows in the Garden Evening. Icy Cafe, Street of the Monkeys, Phom Phen.  By Dag Walker By 9:00 p.m the temperature had dropped to the low 100s in the city. Seated on a quiet back street outside of Icy Cafe, a small group of young backpackers and a few older ex-pats sat sipping beer and rum and smoking endless cigarettes, sweating heavily under the dim pig-tail light bulb above the low doorway of…

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I am sending the Liberian Listener a link to a book that I hope will give your readers some hours of enjoyment as a literary work and one too that will offer insights into the history of many African nations. Given the nature of politics, one must be discrete in this world when reading such a title, given the heavy hand the police and govts. Who knows how many people could easily misinterpret the independent scholar's interest in such a work? Artists & Reviews 

BOOKS: Coup d’État —[Africa] Edward N. Luttwak /REVIEW

The Editor, I’d like to point out, though we don’t need a reminder at all, that as scholars, artists, and intellectuals it is our duty, our life-long duty to learn. We, as thinkers and creators, have a duty to learn as much as we can about the depths and distances of all areas of knowledge known to man. Were we to shy away from areas of thought from fear, then we would betray our gifts as thinking men. But, there are times, there are areas of thought, there are themes that…

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