The Carbonaria Kingdom: A short story

Synopsis Peppered moths are polymorphous insects that usually appear dark or light-colored. And, depending on whether they live in a polluted region or not, one or the other form will thrive. In polluted regions, the dark-colored peppered moths, known as carbonaria, thrive because they use the soot-covered trees to camouflage from birds that prey on them. Hence, the more polluted a region, the more the carbonaria peppered moths. A writer discovers parallels between this phenomenon and his homeland, a place crawling with lepidopterous gargoyles masquerading in the polluted corridors of…

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Liberia Unscrabbled: Ophelia S. Lewis

B O O K R E V I E W By ralph geeplay In this 200 page published riddles book dedicated to Liberia, Africa’s oldest and first republic, author and publisher, Ophelia Lewis brings to life a unique perspective—the history of her native country. LIBERIA UNSCRABBLED, is a book of Puzzles & Trivia and Word Search. It presents amazing brainteasers and outlook on Liberia— a first, and tangs up the reading horizons for those interested in Liberia and its history and culture via the trivia flicks that are presented. For…

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African poets – forget stuffy literature departments…

By Christine Mungai K’naan pic: www.hiphopmarket.com Pastoralist communities in Africa rarely use drums as an integral part of their musical repertoire; Somalia has been called a nation of poets NOBEL laureate poet and playwright Wole Soyinka was widely tipped to become Oxford University’s next Professor of Poetry, but missed out in last week’s nomination to Simon Armitage. Armitage, poet, playwright and broadcaster, secured 1,221 votes – 301 more than Soyinka. It was a controversial race, but not for the reasons you might think. Soyinka initially led the way with the…

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Five African novels to read before you die

African authors have time and time again been passed over for the biggest book prizes. Here are a few who should have won. By Brendon Nicholls There is a surfeit of book prizes. Big ones, small ones, ones that award experimental fiction, others that concentrate on female authors, or young authors, or authors from Ireland or Latin America. African literature is blossoming, and its prize culture is flourishing alongside. The Caine Prize is well-established, and the last few years have seen the establishment of the Mabati-Cornell Kiswahili Prize for work…

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