You are here
Artists & Reviews Op-ed 

From Barbados to Liberia: A deep look into the first Barbadian settlement in Liberia

    It was Edward Wilmot Blyden in consultation with President Daniel Bashiel Warner who developed the plan to encourage emigration to Liberia from the West Indies. Blyden was Secretary of State. He organised a Commission to the West Indies in 1862 to encourage West Indians to return to the Fatherland and to the first free black republic as Liberians identified their new homeland. Blyden had gone back to his birthplace, St. Thomas, and launched a circular appeal throughout the islands. Soon, he was receiving hundreds of letters enquiring about…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

Why the black press is more relevant than ever

  For years, newsrooms across America have had a problem with a lack of diversity and inclusion. People of color are underrepresented among news organizations, which do not reflect the makeup of the general population and have made little progress in the past decade. Although non-whites make up about 40% of the US population, journalists of color comprise only 16.55% of newsrooms’ staff in 2017, according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) Newsroom Employment Diversity Survey. Larger newsrooms and digital news organizations are a little better — 23.4%…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

Mae Azango debut book expected soon

Mae Azango, an award-winning Liberian female journalist, said she is almost done with her debut book, ‘Voice of the Trumpetess.’The book, which is expected to be a must read, chronicles her life from childhood to adulthood and the difficulties she endured during this period.‘Voice of the Trumpetess’ depicts the physical abuses she went through as a child, her failed marriage and many more complicated life struggles she was able to stand tall to. The book’s title is the result of her work as a journalist and the impact her stories…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

The Good The Bad And The Blues is a wicked band!

The Good The Bad And The Blues is the 2011, 2012, 2013 winners of the prestigious Black Swamp Blues Society blues challenge. The band recently performed in Edmonton, Alberta and one of our editors watched them played. below is a brif bio of the band members. Aayan Naim, playing lead guitar and singing is his thing, he grew up in Chicago started playing and singing in the 7th grade, turned pro in the 9th and never looked back By the way he grew up directly across the street from Muddy…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

Museum of contemporary art Africa opens in Cape Town

The invites have been sent for the opening night, the displays readied in 80 galleries spread over nine floors, and 24,000 tickets have sold out in a matter of minutes. For a few short days there is quiet. The calm will not last. In Cape Town, on one of the world’s most recognisable waterfronts in the world, a vast new art museum, the biggest ever in Africa, is about to open, creating the biggest buzz in the continent’s collective creative world for many years. The Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

They killed Biko because he had an idea: that blacks must be proud

“Had Biko been alive today…,” is a refrain often repeated in South Africa, especially when the country finds itself struggling to meet its own ideals. Bantu Steve Biko died at the hands of apartheid police on Sept. 12, 1977. Handcuffed, beaten, and naked for twenty days before his death of a massive brain hemorrhage Biko was only 31 year old when he died. Now, a new generation is increasingly turning to this martyr as a guide through the new South Africa, perhaps much more than they do Nelson Mandela “Why,…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

Review: Jabbeh Wesley’s When The Wanderers Come Home

When the Wanderers Come Home is a grieving love letter to Liberia, a country that contains her story By Bidisha SK Mamata In Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s powerful When the Wanderers Come Home, the search for a place of arrival, self-recognition and remembrance continues, but doesn’t find a resting place. Wesley was born in Liberia but settled in America; this pained and poignant collection focuses on her return to the former. She traces relatives, interviews women war survivors and figuratively and literally searches through the detritus of violence, poverty and natural…

Read More
Artists & Reviews News 

Marcus Garvey and UNIA Failed Liberia Expedition

By Morgan Files Widespread misconceptions surround the aborted plans for a UNIA settlement program in the Republic of Liberia in the 1920s. Chief among these is that the Liberian upper classes were averse to Garvey’s plans which would have undermined “Americo-Liberian hegemony” over the country. The more complicated truth has less to do with “Americo-Liberian hegemony” than a curious combination of French, British and American interests in Africa, an all-too-human rivalry between Garvey and African-American scholar W.E.B. Du Bois, and Marcus Garvey’s own failure to keep his grandiose plans under…

Read More
Artists & Reviews 

Cross Lines Premieres In Philadelphia This weekend

Philadelphia—Smooth Fusion Films will see a special movie premiere of “Crossed Lines” this weekend, June 9th in the United States, Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love. This Premiere will provide the viewers with a Red Carpet Experience, Question and Answer session and an after party; Food & Beverages will also be on sale. The Movie Premiere is being hosted in an effort to expose the new movie to the public and raise funds in order to continue assisting with world-wide projects, such as: Feed the Hungry in Liberia; Support Ashmon…

Read More
Artists & Reviews 

The Rise And Paradoxes Of Pan-Africanism Today

Of the numerous concepts which have influenced Black Africa since the wave of independence in the 1960s, pan-Africanism is, after democracy, probably the most popular. Paradoxically, the continent remains the least integrated in the world and continues to experience outbreaks of xenophobic violence. Historically, the first pan-African movement, founded in the late 19th century, was a search for a common identity: “˜pan-Negrism’. The aim was to unite black people across the world in order to fight slavery and colonialism. Pioneers were Edward Blyden, WEB Dubois, Stokely Carmichael and Kwame Nkrumah….

Read More