A Memo to Nat Mcgill, Liberia’s minister of State for Presidential affairs.

To me, this action on the part of the minister is an insult to the Liberian masses. The average Liberian lives on less than US$1.00 a day. McGill's loan to acquire a mansion, sends a bad message to everyone and solidifies the notion that the only quick way to get rich is working for government. This action on the part of the Minister of state undermines the "Pro-poor Agenda"

The Editor The reason some of us opposed a third-term for the Unity Party-led government under President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was the rampant corruption and flagrant disregard for accountability and transparency. This new administration under the leadership of President George Weah is set on the foundation of a “pro-poor agenda”, we expect officials of this government to live up to and act that. A few days ago, media reports surfaced about Minister of State McGill taking a US$200,000 loan from the Liberia Bank for Development and Investment (LBDI) to buy/build a…

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“LRA Rural Campaign Awareness Receives Boost But…”

But we all know that most of our government ministers are worthless human beings! They steal. They take kickbacks. And they spend our tax dollars frivolously to buy tainted SUV's and pay $600,000 rent to landlords!

The Editor The Liberian people might be uneducated, but they’are NOT stupid! The Liberian Revenue Authority [LRA] Commissioner-General (Elfreda Tamba-Stewart) says that “It is through tax education that we can harden voluntary (tax) complaince, and this remains a cogent part of our corporate strategic plan” (Re “LRA Rural Campaign Awareness Receives Boost But…”, Daily Observer Online) But who in their right mind needs “tax education” to pay taxes when they see, with their own two eyes, government ministers stealing or misusing their tax dollars? Common sense tells us that those…

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Women and the movement for African unity

Many articles have been written reflecting on five decades of historical experience — referred to as the 50th anniversary of the “Year of Africa” — since 17 African nations gained political independence. Yet few pay adequate attention to the indispensable role of women in the campaigns for national liberation and their continuing efforts in the present century.

    Many articles have been written reflecting on five decades of historical experience — referred to as the 50th anniversary of the “Year of Africa” — since 17 African nations gained political independence. Yet few pay adequate attention to the indispensable role of women in the campaigns for national liberation and their continuing efforts in the present century On Aug. 9, 1956, some 20,000 women in South Africa marched from various regions to the apartheid capital of Pretoria. They represented a cross-section of women, most of whom were African,…

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